App 2.0

by Nava (http://navahq.com)

Nava is a public benefit corporation that works with governments to create sharp user experiences built on rock solid infrastructure. We’re a team of technologists and designers whose work simplifies life for millions of Americans each year while dramatically reducing costs.

Nava has a broad range of experience working with agencies: we’ve rapidly fixed urgent technical issues, designed and built large systems and APIs from the ground up, replaced ailing legacy technology, and performed complex integrations.

Most recently, Nava worked with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimagine the consumer experience of HealthCare.gov by building App 2.0, which now powers the majority of health insurance applications. Usable across all modern devices, App 2.0 sits on simple, scalable cloud infrastructure, and increases conversion of consumers through HealthCare.gov in significantly less time.

Why they won

Most of the awardees today aren’t household names. Not yet, at least. But everyone here should know App 2.0 the technology that powers the majority of the health insurance applications of the relaunched Healthcare.gov website and Nava as the team that built the new service in cooperation with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

App 2.0 is a great example of doing things differently in federal government: It is fully portable with no lock-in. It comes with robust monitoring, and has a simple design. It is hosted on a commodity cloud provider, so new infrastructure can be spun up in minutes instead of months, responding to demand. The relaunched service moves 30% more people through the health insurance process in half the time.

It’s usable across all modern devices and, in some cases, reduced the number of screens a user must go through from 76 to 16. Now, an average application is finished in 9 minutes instead of 21. So not only did it help save the Affordable Care Act which has now made it possible for for 17.6 million Americans to have health insurance, ultimately it demonstrated technology practices governments must adopt if our digital services are to work.

The App 2.0 team was born from a desperate call for technologists to serve their country. These men and women were supposed to be part of a short-term “tech surge” but came to realize what government services can mean to real people in their communities — their neighbors, their families, and people they would only ever know through customer support. So they decided to stick with the mission and build a company that government can work with to ensure the services we promise the American public work.